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  #11  
Old 04-18-2012, 06:47 AM
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Dobster Dobster is offline
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Really sorry to hear that

Having never had a pet in my life (apart from goldfish), I was talked into getting a rescue kitten. Going into the rescue centre Ruby took an instant liking to me and kept climbing up onto my shoulders . I never thought I would feel that way about an animal but the bond between us was so strong. She was quite a feral cat that had been discarded in a big town before I took her in. This made her want to explore everywhere. Sadly after 6 months of having her she got ran over by a car . It was the hardest thing in my life so far seeing her in pain at the vets . She lasted another day before dieing of her injuries.

I now have 2 more rescue cats and before getting them seriously thought about keeping them indoors. It feels a bit cruel to me keeping them inside, they get so bored and just want to go and play. It is a hard decision to make because of the risks. They are now 2 years old and thankfully do not go far from the house. The worry is always on my mind but I just don't think I could keep them locked indoors all the time.
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Old 04-21-2012, 01:41 AM
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Harlequin Harlequin is offline
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This is propably the worst. Coming home and finding your cat dead/dying. Been there...done that.

At least I dont know what "skittled" means so it doesn't feel to bad I think.
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Old 04-21-2012, 12:34 PM
zidders zidders is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dobster View Post
They are now 2 years old and thankfully do not go far from the house. The worry is always on my mind but I just don't think I could keep them locked indoors all the time.
Dobster, I know this is gonna sound nuts but you can actually train your cats to go out with you on a leash. It takes a bit of time and a lot of patience but trust me, it's a lot better to do that than to let them run loose. Also, try a laser pointer. If you have stairs, zip the laser up and down stairs. Plenty of excercise.

I know I sound like a broken record but you're helping your cat more by keeping them indoors than by letting them roam.

http://wildlife.state.co.us/SiteColl...tsoutandin.pdf
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Old 04-22-2012, 06:13 PM
medea fleecestealer medea fleecestealer is offline
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Cat + outside = Stolen, hurt by someone elses pet, run over by a car, injured somewhere by something, causing injury to someones pet or some person somewhere, possibly leading to a lawsuit/pet being euthanized, damage done to local flora and fauna-seriously, there are a ton of negatives here. So much can happen and it's SO irresponsible to let a pet run loose. Domestic cats were specifically bred to be indoor companion animals, they are NOT a natural part of the environment. The mere fact that most countries allow domesticated animals is amazing, considering the effect non-native species have on the environment.

In fact, one of PETA's main agendas is taking away peoples ability to have pets because they feel it's unnatural for humans to keep animals. Stupid? Very but the reason their arguments make sense to so many people is because there's a grain of truth to it. We're completely responsible for making most dog and cat breeds due to selective breeding, which is why we need to be responsible pet owners, which means keeping dogs and cats inside or giving them fenced in yards and special enclosures so that they stay confined to a specific area and aren't a danger to people or the local ecology. Your cat and dog might be the best pets in the world but an animal that feels threatened or thinks it sees something to hunt and ends up having instinct kick in can be a dangerous thing.

If you keep your cat inside and control its diet, you don't have to worry about obesity. We feed our dogs a combination organic dog food and bones and raw food diet. They are extremely fit and healthy (they're ibizan hounds), and it doesn't cost nearly as much as commercial dog food does. It's healthier for them too. Your cat doesn't need to be outside to excercise. Get it something to climb on. Climbing and chasing a laser pointer gives them a pretty decent workout. We have a large yard and we let our dogs run and play together for a few hours each day. If you don't have a yard, many cities and towns have dog parks. You can get them excercise there and they get to socialize with other dogs, which is great for their immune system and for their temperment.
Zidders, I'm sorry but excuse my French, some of this is a load of ...

Where did you get the idea that cats were bred to be indoor companions? Most likely they gravitated to man because the pickings were good around manmade habitations (think mice, rats, voles, etc.). Then humans started feeding them and they found they were on to a really good thing, but it has never stopped their hunting instincts even after thousands of years of "domestication".

PETA's arguments make sense if you want to see wholesale slaughter of all those animals who can no longer be kept as pets and who, as a consequence, will become endangered species. After all, where would dogs, cats, etc., fit into any ecosystem in the world as wild animals these days? But yes, I do agree that these days it is better to keep cats in an enclosed area, simply because there are so many dangers in big cities and unfortunately, a lot of people who like to hurt animals and think it's fun.

All of my cats have been outdoor roamers and none of them have ever been fat because of it. And as you pointed out regarding your dogs, if cats don't get the opportunity to mix with other cats their immune system can't always cope with illnesses that an outdoor cat would shrug off.

Unfortunately, I'm afraid in America the measures you suggest are probably for the best to keep your cats (and dogs) safe, but thankfully in most places in Europe we don't need to go to those lengths.

DragonWolf, I'm sorry to hear about your two cats. It's to sad to lose both so close together, especially when one is so young too. We had to have our 16 year old cat put to sleep a few years ago due to cancer and we still miss her very much. But we hope to be able to give another cat a good home soon and I hope you'll find it in your heart to do the same.
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